First Friday Links - Lots o' Money-Related Stuff!

Leaf suspended in mid-air on a recent hike on the Lewis & Clark trails in St. Charles. No suspension was visible to the naked eye and we appreciated its surreal appearance too much to "break" the illusion. If it was an illusion at all...

Leaf suspended in mid-air on a recent hike on the Lewis & Clark trails in St. Charles. No suspension was visible to the naked eye and we appreciated its surreal appearance too much to "break" the illusion. If it was an illusion at all...

This is the first monthly links post, but it's been over a month since I last posted - actually it's been since the end of May, when I went on vacation - and I've found lots of good stuff for you to check out. 

So as to not overwhelm you, this time around I've decided to share only bookmarks related to money, frugality and spending - also known as some of my favorite topics these days, along with frugality and minimalism. 

First off, if you have any investments at all and you are paying attention to what the stock market is doing, you should read Stock Market Meltdown Implications for Everyone, by Financial Samurai.  His response is the most reasonable of those I've read, and most inline with what I think. And, in case you're wondering, I had been sitting on some cash waiting for a market correction before I opened and funded a Roth IRA. Which I did, and then the market dropped some more. But that's okay, because I'm going to keep adding to it regularly. 

If you're less optimistic, you might enjoy reading The Big Bad Bear Case from NorthmanTrader. 

Rich People Like to Read, according to Business Insider. In particular, they like to read non-fiction books that will improve their chances of being successful. I like to read novels, which is, I guess, a very middle class thing to do. But I'm not stopping. 

25 things I learned selling my life possessions (a lesson in minimalism) 

Frugal Rules saved $100 per month by switching to Cricket Wireless, which I think is what we're going to do, as soon as Eric's phone is off contract. In the meantime, we changed over to Verizon's new contract-less system and chopped $40 off our bill, which is better than nothing. 

Becoming a Saver is a deceptively subtle title for what may be one of the best single blog posts on how to move toward spending less and saving more. It gives detailed instructions on what steps you should take if you want to save more of your income and have the option of retiring early. What really stood out for me was the idea that when you're cutting spending, you should always be a little uncomfortable. Cut until you're uncomfortable, wait until you get used to it, then cut again. I love that. 

Here's Sam's post, Why I Kept a Frugal Food Budget.  Unlike Sam, I intend to keep going with my frugal food budget and maybe even cut if further, if I can. 

File under "places I'm not yet ready to go": Cait at Blonde on a Budget is embarking on her second year-long shopping ban and here are the rules. At some point, I might be ready to do this, but not just yet. 

And if you want to compare yourself to others, you can find a list of blogger's self-reported net worths at Rockstar Finance. Also, if you were only going to subscribe to one personal finance email, make it Rockstar Finance. Every weekday J. sends out one post with links to three of the best recent finance-related blog posts.