Food Friday Recipe: An Easy Frittata

We had a bunch of eggs from the Behrer Home for Wayward Fowl and some peppers that were starting to go bad, so I made a frittata. I used The Pioneer Woman's Sunday Frittata as a starting point, then I decided to borrow her format for a blog post. Eric wants to turn this blog into a food blog, or so it seems, so I thought since Food Waste Friday is food-related, I would add a weekly Food Friday recipe post. Then eventually Eric can start his own food blog, dammit. 

A frittata is basically a a crustless quiche. It's also a good way to use up whatever vegetable bits you have on hand. You can use onions, peppers, broccoli, tomatoes, asparagus... Basically, anything, fresh, jarred, canned, frozen - it doesn't matter. You can add cheese and meat, too, and basically the same "anything goes" applies. 

Here's the recipe. I know PW puts the recipe at the end of her posts, but that drives me nuts. So I'm going to do what Beth at Budget Bytes does, and put the recipe up front. 

One-Pan Frittata

  • 1 onion, diced
  • 3 bell peppers, chopped
  • 2 tomatoes, diced
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 21 Seasoning Salute to taste (optional)
  • 12 eggs
  • 1/3 cup nutritional yeast flakes (or cheese)

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Saute onion and peppers in greased cast-iron skillet over medium heat. Dice tomatoes and add to skillet. Season with salt, pepper and 21 Seasoning Salute. In another bowl, break the eggs and whisk with nutritional yeast or grated/shredded cheese. Pour egg mixture into skillet with vegetable mixture. Move skillet to oven and bake at 375 for 25 minutes, checking every 10 minutes. 

When it's done, it will look dry on top and a toothpick inserted into eggs will come out dry. 

First, I threw a little bacon fat into our 12" cast iron skillet. The Pioneer Woman (PW after this) said to use a nonstick skillet, and the cast iron is the closest I've got. In the past, I made my frittatas in glass baking pans, without cooking the veggies first, so this was an experiment.

Yes, I reuse the cast iron skillet without cleaning it out all that well. No, it hasn't killed me yet. 

Yes, I reuse the cast iron skillet without cleaning it out all that well. No, it hasn't killed me yet. 

I chopped up an onion, setting aside the skins for compost and the ends and first layer for the bag of stock ingredients we keep in the freezer. 

I threw the onions in the skillet to saute over medium heat. 

You can tell from the shapes of the onion bits that I have no real knife skills to speak of. 

You can tell from the shapes of the onion bits that I have no real knife skills to speak of. 

Next up, peppers. See those black spots on their shoulders? A sign that the end is near. The yellow one looks good, but I found a little bit of black on the inside. I cut out all the moldy parts and chopped up the rest. 

While the peppers and onions sauteed, I chopped up two tomatoes. 

Then I added the salt, pepper and Trader Joe's 21 Seasoning Salute to the mix in the skillet. You could just as well add this to the eggs. 

That "21" on top of the 21 Seasoning Salute jar is part of my new spice organization. 

That "21" on top of the 21 Seasoning Salute jar is part of my new spice organization

Next, I cracked a dozen eggs into a bowl and, since Eric can't eat dairy, I added 1/3 cup nutritional yeast flakes and an equal amount of water, because yeast flakes sometimes make things too thick. Nutritional yeast flakes give food a cheesy flavor that works well in dishes like this. They also have lots of B vitamins and other good stuff along those lines. 

Why 1/3 cup? The 1/4 cup was dirty. 

Why 1/3 cup? The 1/4 cup was dirty. 

I dumped the eggs into the skillet and mixed them in, then I put the skillet in the oven at 375 degrees for 25 minutes (much longer than the 10 minutes PW's recipe took to bake). 

When it first came out of the oven, it had some puffy spots, but they went away with time. 

The finished frittata stuck a little to the sides of the skillet, which I didn't make any effort to cover in oil, so totally my own fault. Next time, I'll make one that can slide right out on to the cutting board, just like PW. 

Since I couldn't slide it out onto the cutting board, I cut it up with a pizza cutter. Somehow I've been brainwashed by Eric into thinking the pizza cutter is perfect for nearly all cutting applications, including dough. 

Ironically, Eric wasn't even around when I made the frittata and I'm pretty sure he has no photo-documentation of the bread he baked today. But I took a picture, right after I ate half a loaf. Do yourself a favor and don't let anyone make fresh bread in your house. 

Too good. Do not let this happen in your kitchen. Stick to frittatas. 

Too good. Do not let this happen in your kitchen. Stick to frittatas.