Extra Poem: Bring on the Goddamn Cat

Another one sent to me by the same friend. She says, "That's what happens when you google 'poem about beer and cats.'" 

This cat, Barry, lives in a Genever bar in Antwerp, Belgium and is a Luddite. Surprisingly, I don't seem to have any pictures of cats and beer so this will have to do. 

This cat, Barry, lives in a Genever bar in Antwerp, Belgium and is a Luddite. Surprisingly, I don't seem to have any pictures of cats and beer so this will have to do. 

You know how I feel about cats, and surely beer doesn't need any sort of introduction. 

Since this one is an Irish toast that's been done as a song, it's easy to find on the internet and impossible to find anyone to whom I can credit the work. So I'm going to copy the entire thing into this blog post without worrying about making anyone angry. 

Some Guinness was spilt on the barroom floor
When the pub was shut for the night.
When out of his hole crept a wee brown mouse
And stood in the pale moonlight.
He lapped up the frothy foam from the floor
Then back on his haunches he sat.
And all night long, you could hear the mouse roar,
"Bring on the goddamn cat!"

Follow this link to hear the song version performed by Fighter Pilots from Alconbury. I'm going to have this stuck in my head all day, I'm sure. Maybe I'll make "Bring on the goddamn cat!" my motto for the day. 

Poetry Set to Music

The boundary between Irish drinking songs and real life... No, wait. The boundary between poetry and lyrics is a thin line, at best. Some songs you'd probably never think of as poetry (a lot of pop music), while some song-writers' lyrics have been published as poetry. 

There was even a class at my college that looked at song lyrics as poetry. I never took this class. As an undergrad, I avoided English, literature and writing classes as much as possible, for reasons I don't really understand to this day. I even went so far as to get a Bachelor of Science so I could avoid foreign language classes. You know, because I hate words, writing and reading. See? It's inexplicable. 

Anyhow, music is an important part of our lives and has been for a looong time. Maybe as long as we've had lives, and probably before we had words. 

Just as reading poetry aloud gives the words another layer of meaning through the vocal intonations of the reader, setting words to music adds many layers of meaning. In a way, I guess this makes it easier for compositions to qualify as lyrics, because of the added voices from the music, whereas poetry has to stand on its own, silently, on the page. 

A subtle difference, maybe, but an interesting one. 

Now, bring on the goddamn cat!

(Thanks again, Sara!)

Week Five: Creative - Poem-A-Day

  1. Day One - Names
  2. Extra Poem - I Am Vertical
  3. Day Two - Non-lieux
  4. Extra Poem - Bring on the Goddamn Cat
  5. Day Three - As a Portent
  6. Extra Poem - To Autumn
  7. Day Four - Playback
  8. Day Five - Last Night
  9. Day Six - Black Cat
  10. Day Seven - Weave In, My Hardy Life
  11. Extra Poems
  12. Conclusion